©2018 by mindfill.interwaste.co.za. Proudly created by Interwaste Marketing

Over the centuries, paper has been made from a wide variety of materials — wood pulp, rice, water plants, cotton, even old clothes! But no matter what you use to make paper — you need “fiber.” Today's paper fiber comes mainly from two sources — pulpwood logs and recycled paper products.

The advantages of recycling paper include saving energy, water and landfill space. Paper recycling helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the recycled fiber is then used as a sustainable, cost-saving resource for making new paper products.

 

White Paper

W1

Consists of unprinted white woodfree paper, board, cuts or shavings - which are free from water insoluble matter. This is usually industrial off cuts.

Heavy Letter One

HL1

Consists of white printed / unprinted sheets and shavings originating from printers or office records. This grade must be free of heavily printed or coloured stock as well as non-water soluble adhesives.
This can be loose or baled.

Heavy Letter Two

HL2

Consists of pastel coloured printed / unprinted sheets, shavings and cuttings originating from printers or office records. This grade must be free of heavily printed or coloured stock, as well as non-water soluble adhesives.
Can be loose or baled.

Super Mix

SMW

Made from of mix of HL1 / HL2 in ratio 50% HL1, 50% HL2. This grade must be free of non-water soluble adhesives.


Can be loose or baled.

Flat News

FN

Consists of overrun unsold newspapers, containing no more than the normal percentage of inserts. No xerographic printed material allowed.

This is for newspapers only.

Special Magazine

SBM

Consists of unsold magazines, and trims from magazine printers (including catalogues, brochures with or without latex bindings). May contain up to 10% of uncoated news type paper.


This can include books, flyers and magazines.

Common Mix

CMW

A mixture of various grades of paper and board without restriction on fiber content. This can include any material made with fibers (such as take away drink cups, popcorn boxes, tissues, paper towels, cardboard that is not corrugated, etc.)


This is the lowest valuable grade and should only consist of materials that do not suit the higher grades.

Paper collected for recycling is sorted, graded and taken to a paper mill. From here, pulp is created and then screened, cleaned and turned into new paper.